Sign in

This item in the old zine archive is a bit of a mystery. A ‘whodunnit’ even. The zinemaker left this one unsigned. And I want to know : Who was it?!? There are clues here and there, but one has to wonder why no name was attached. Not even a pseudonym.

While mostly a bike-focused zine, it does have a fantastic layout featuring a beauty of backside smith grind, so it totally counts. Just about every layout here is dripping with perfectly degraded xeroxing, and the photography is actually pretty good.

But, the mystery of who authored this one is…


The scanner has been quiet, but the archives are still deep my friends. Thanks for your patience.

Today’s time capsule takes us to a May 1989 issue of Dicks Book, a SWANK publications inc thing.

Symptoms of 1989 can include:
A Mike Valleley wall ride. Ollies with squirrels. Steve Claar boosting a massive ollie over channel at some ramp. Musings on the meaning of life. A hunky GSD throwing down a frontside grind, only to be outdone by Justin Lovely booze-grinding the 7-foot deep end. And Watt, mid-groove with fIREHOSE.

Don’t call your doctor. It will pass in 32 years or so. Maybe.

Download a full issue scan here.


Indoor skate spots. Precious real estate for every cold and wet skateboarder, especially during the dark winter months. Pete DiAntoini was exactly where he needed to be, at some of the best indoor skate spots in the midwest and east coast circa 1987, prowling behind the lens and lurking in copy shops to document the radness for posterity.

Clueless #4 includes shots from Milwaukee’s ‘The Turf’, P.I.S.S. (private indoor skate spot) in Minneapolis, shots of Gomer and the Birdman, fish eye perspectives, a Ho-Ho plant by Steve Schneer, and a sweet sweet layback by an unidentified Milwaukean. (A Beaudoin brother, perhaps?)

Pete’s still behind the lens, and post good stuff old and new at https://www.instagram.com/pete____d/.

Download a full scan of this issue here.


This issue of Skate Fate has a lot going on. First off, I had forgotten that Gary published this monthly for six years, and this issue marked the end of that run. Something about too many other zines and the scene changing. All true since 1982 for sure. A guy deserves a vacation now and then, right?

This issue has a good and lengthy interview with Chris Miller, with some fantastic photos by J. Grant Brittain to boot.

There’s a scan of Bill Danforth’s business card.

Oh, and it came with a piece of tile from Del Mar. Mine’s blue.

Download a full scan of this issue here.


Beef Street, by Ray Stevens II, was one of the first skate zines from outside my local scene that I landed my grubby hands on. In the summer of 1985, the Faction and the Drab rolled through town. I lived one house away from the big skate ramp in town built by Rich Flowerday. The Faction stayed with Rich, and I cleared it with my folks to have th Drab stay at our place. As I recall, they had a few days off between shows, so there were some great sessions at Rich’s, where my friends and i took great…


For a while, I made a zine called Tiki.

This issue of Tiki chronicles a short but productive detour I took in 1988/89 to Los Angeles, working on Home Boy and Freestylin’ magazines taking pictures and running the darkroom. The opportunity that came as a result of making and sharing zines, and meeting the people who made them. Hours after graduating high school in 1988, Kevin, Mike and I drove to the west coast where Andy and I hatched a plan to carve out a job for me there. I told my parents that I wouldn’t be enrolling for college…


This issue of Deathbox has no clear identifying info about the zine-maker, and whatever correspondence that came with it’s arrival in my mailbox in 1988 has been lost. So, I turned to my contacts in the DEEP SKATE, who helped ID one Ross Freeman as the fine creator.

I never really thought about skate zines having a regional flavor before, but this one has Massachusets all over it : halftones, snow, and great full page snaps of local rippers unknown to me, but tag ’em if you know ‘em!

Full PDF scan of the issue here.


There is a lot to love about All Fours #7 beyond the ghostly silhouette of Lee Ralph blasting:

  1. the legal size paper fold-over cover (an idea i am shocked I didn’t steal for my zine)
  2. The Natas ollie pic
  3. The contrast.
  4. Tom Knox lein to tail pic.
  5. A Michelob Dark tribute.
  6. Nighttime curb session pics.
  7. A massive Misfits centerfold that was un-scannable with my weak home scanner set up.
  8. Dave Carnie sweeper pic.
  9. Jeff Hedges invert pic.

Hell yeah.

My old brain can’t remember who slapped this together. Do you?

Download a full scan of this issue here.


John Dettman’s Naughty Nomads landed in my mailbox in the fall of 1987, chronicling the adventures of one wheelchair-bound lad named Leeder O. Men. In just a few short pages, it was clear that Leeder was more rad and had way more fun than you and your friends. I’m not aware of the origin story or Leeder O. Men, or if there is one, it probably doesn’t really matter though.

Not to overanalyze it, but I love how the short comic frames a state of a skateboarder’s (or wheelchair shredder’s) mind: whether it’s stoke-obsessed dreaming, big scary tricks, or just simply sinking a put. Also included: arts by Phred, photos Miki, and breaking news from Oro State Park, where a man was caught peeping waist deep in the muck of the women’s outhouse. Eww.

Download a PDF of this issue here.


“Mel Bend?” I asked Kevin, as I thumbed through a copy of Bend Zine #4 which had landed in his mailbox recently. “Is that his real name?” Kevin shrugged.

“Who. The. Fuck. Is. MEL. BEND?” I asked myself flipping through page after page of scribbles and drawings, great photos pulled together with layout skills far, far beyond an average teen zine maker like I was. And why, after years of absorbing and memorizing the finest print and most obscure and pointless skate trivia in any skate mag I could ever get my hand on, had I never before seen the…

bernie

Stella's dad, Amazon Digital Music Product Manager, Nebraskan

Get the Medium app

A button that says 'Download on the App Store', and if clicked it will lead you to the iOS App store
A button that says 'Get it on, Google Play', and if clicked it will lead you to the Google Play store